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What are the parts of a metal working vice?

Jaws

A vice has two jaws: a stationary jaw and a sliding jaw. The size of the jaws will vary depending on the size, type and model of the vice. 

 

The jaws are the adjustable ‘teeth’ portion of a clamp and are where items are firmly held. They are called ‘teeth’ as they grip onto objects by sinking into them. On metalworking vices, the surfaces of the jaws are serrated, to provide greater grip on the workpiece being held, and are usually made from hardened steel.

The surfaces are often replaceable so that when the serrations become dull, the user can simply attach new ones, rather than replacing the whole vice.

 

The jaws can be covered with pads made of softer materials such as rubber or plastic, to prevent them from damaging any fragile material, while still having a firm grip on the object.

A vice has two jaws: a stationary jaw and a sliding jaw. The size of the jaws will vary depending on the size, type and model of the vice. 

 

The jaws are the adjustable ‘teeth’ portion of a clamp and are where items are firmly held. They are called ‘teeth’ as they grip onto objects by sinking into them. On metalworking vices, the surfaces of the jaws are serrated, to provide greater grip on the workpiece being held, and are usually made from hardened steel.

The surfaces are often replaceable so that when the serrations become dull, the user can simply attach new ones, rather than replacing the whole vice.

 

The jaws can be covered with pads made of softer materials such as rubber or plastic, to prevent them from damaging any fragile material, while still having a firm grip on the object.

Slide

The slide is the machined extension part of the vice which is attached to the sliding jaw.  

 

The slide works by moving in and out of the body of the vice, keeping the sliding jaw in perfect alignment with the stationary jaw.

The slide is the machined extension part of the vice which is attached to the sliding jaw.  

 

The slide works by moving in and out of the body of the vice, keeping the sliding jaw in perfect alignment with the stationary jaw.

Screw

The screw is usually embodied within the slide and is the part that is in control of opening and closing the jaws of the vice. The length of this screw determines how wide the jaws of the vice can be opened. 

 

The body of the main screw is threaded. ‘Acme’ is the thread form commonly used on a vice screw, as its shape is easy to machine and assemble. A thread ‘form’ is the shape that the helical ridge around a screw takes. 

The acme thread shape has a wider base than other thread forms, which means it offers greater strength, as the screw can support a heavier load. This, therefore, means the vice can hold large and heavy workpieces with less risk of the screw breaking.

 

This thread form also allows the use of a split-nut which is ideal for manufacturing vices with a quick-release mechanism. 

 

The screw is held in place within the vice’s body by a nut, which keeps the screw static once the jaws are closed around a workpiece. The end of the screw is attached to the vice handle which controls the screw’s movement.

The screw is usually embodied within the slide and is the part that is in control of opening and closing the jaws of the vice. The length of this screw determines how wide the jaws of the vice can be opened. 

 

The body of the main screw is threaded. ‘Acme’ is the thread form commonly used on a vice screw, as its shape is easy to machine and assemble. A thread ‘form’ is the shape that the helical ridge around a screw takes.

The acme thread shape has a wider base than other thread forms, which means it offers greater strength, as the screw can support a heavier load. This, therefore, means the vice can hold large and heavy workpieces with less risk of the screw breaking.

 

This thread form also allows the use of a split-nut which is ideal for manufacturing vices with a quick-release mechanism. 

 

The screw is held in place within the vice’s body by a nut, which keeps the screw static once the jaws are closed around a workpiece. The end of the screw is attached to the vice handle which controls the screw’s movement.

Handle

The vice handle can be turned clockwise or anti-clockwise in order to open or close the jaws.


The handle is a long, thin metal rod and is attached to the outer end of the screw, which is located at the front of the slide. The handle has thick nuts on either end so that it does not slip out of the screw’s hold.

The handle is usually made from forged steel for strength and durability.

 

The handle can also be known as the tommy bar. This is due to slang that has derived from the First World War when British soldiers were referred to as “Tommies” and a tommy bar was the name given to a spanner used to assemble and disassemble grenade bombs.

The vice handle can be turned clockwise or anti-clockwise in order to open or close the jaws.

 

The handle is a long, thin metal rod and is attached to the outer end of the screw, which is located at the front of the slide. The handle has thick nuts on either end so that it does not slip out of the screw’s hold.

The handle is usually made from forged steel for strength and durability.

 

The handle can also be known as the tommy bar. This is due to slang that has derived from the First World War when British soldiers were referred to as “Tommies” and a tommy bar was the name given to a spanner used to assemble and disassemble grenade bombs.

Base

The base is the part of a vice that mounts to the workbench. Metalworking vices are available with various different types of bases, which include fixed, swivel, clamp and vacuum bases.

The base is the part of a vice that mounts to the workbench. Metalworking vices are available with various different types of bases, which include fixed, swivel, clamp and vacuum bases.

Additional Features

Anvil

Some metalworking vices, such as multi-purpose types, have the extra feature of an anvil fitted onto their fixed bodies. 

 

This anvil can allow for light hammering or shaping to be done. The anvil may come in use when completing small tasks, such as straightening out a bent nail.

Some metalworking vices, such as multi-purpose types, have the extra feature of an anvil fitted onto their fixed bodies. 

 

This anvil can allow for light hammering or shaping to be done. The anvil may come in use when completing small tasks, such as straightening out a bent nail.

Pipe Jaws

Some metalworking vices, such as multi-purpose types, have the extra feature of an anvil fitted onto their fixed bodies. 

 

This anvil can allow for light hammering or shaping to be done. The anvil may come in use when completing small tasks, such as straightening out a bent nail.

Some metalworking vices, such as multi-purpose types, have the extra feature of an anvil fitted onto their fixed bodies. 

 

This anvil can allow for light hammering or shaping to be done. The anvil may come in use when completing small tasks, such as straightening out a bent nail.

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