what-is-a-masonry-saw

     
 

What is a masonry saw?

 
         
         
  Shop for Masonry Saws  
         
         
  Masonry saw  

A masonry saw looks very similar to a standard hand saw, but it has a longer blade and larger teeth.

 
         
     

Material and Application

 
  The most common application in which you would use a masonry saw is for cutting lightweight cellular concrete blocks to size.

 

The most common application in which you would use a masonry saw is for cutting lightweight cellular concrete blocks to size. 

 
         
  Different materials that can be cut by a Masonry saw  

There may be models available which can also cut through brick, stone and concrete, but the most commonly-available ones are designed to cut through cellular concrete blocks only.

 
         
     

Characteristics

 

  A masonry saw has a very large, long blade that comes in a variety of lenths from 625 mm to 700 mm  

Blade

A masonry saw has a very large, long blade which cannot usually be removed from the handle.

 

Blades are available in a variety of lengths, ranging from 625 – 700mm (24.6-27.5″ approx.)

 
         
 
Masonry saws usually have between 1 to 3 teeth per inch
 

Teeth Per Inch (TPI)

Masonry saws usually have between 1 and 3 teeth per inch.

 

A hand saw for masonry will usually have large teeth and deep gullets to carry dust and waste material out of the cut preventing it from becoming blocked.

 
         
  Masonary saw  

Cutting stroke

Most masonry saws are designed to cut on the push stroke.

 

For more information, see our section: Push stroke saws vs. pull stroke saws.

 
         
  The teeth are usually made from or coated with Tungsten carbide, which is a metal twice as hard as steel and more resistant to heat damage.  

Tungsten teeth

The teeth are usually made from or coated with tungsten carbide, which is a metal twice as hard as steel and more resistant to heat damage. Tungsten carbide is used on other cutting tools designed for use in masonry, such as drill bits.

 
         
 
Masonry saw blades have rounded teeth
 

Rounded teeth

Unlike most other saws which have pointed teeth designed to slice through the fibres of material, some masonry saw blades  have teeth with rounded tips.

 

This is for two reasons:

 
         
 
Rounded teeth of masonry saw
 

1. Pointed teeth would become rounded in masonry very quickly.

 

2. When cutting, the round teeth chip away at the material rather than slicing through it.

 
         
  Masonry saws have what’s known as a closed pistol grip handle.  

Handle

Masonry saws have what’s known as a closed pistol grip handle. This type of handle isusually found on saws with larger or longer blades. 

The handle supports the blade and makes it easier for the user to apply force to the saw when cutting through tough materials.

 
         

what-is-a-masonry-saw

     
 

What is a masonry saw?

 
         
         
  Shop for Masonry Saws  
         
         
  Masonry saw  

A masonry saw looks very similar to a standard hand saw, but it has a longer blade and larger teeth.

 
         
     

Material and Application

 
  The most common application in which you would use a masonry saw is for cutting lightweight cellular concrete blocks to size.

 

The most common application in which you would use a masonry saw is for cutting lightweight cellular concrete blocks to size. 

 
         
  Different materials that can be cut by a Masonry saw  

There may be models available which can also cut through brick, stone and concrete, but the most commonly-available ones are designed to cut through cellular concrete blocks only.

 
         
     

Characteristics

 

  A masonry saw has a very large, long blade that comes in a variety of lenths from 625 mm to 700 mm  

Blade

A masonry saw has a very large, long blade which cannot usually be removed from the handle.

 

Blades are available in a variety of lengths, ranging from 625 – 700mm (24.6-27.5″ approx.)

 
         
 
Masonry saws usually have between 1 to 3 teeth per inch
 

Teeth Per Inch (TPI)

Masonry saws usually have between 1 and 3 teeth per inch.

 

A hand saw for masonry will usually have large teeth and deep gullets to carry dust and waste material out of the cut preventing it from becoming blocked.

 
         
  Masonary saw  

Cutting stroke

Most masonry saws are designed to cut on the push stroke.

 

For more information, see our section: Push stroke saws vs. pull stroke saws.

 
         
  The teeth are usually made from or coated with Tungsten carbide, which is a metal twice as hard as steel and more resistant to heat damage.  

Tungsten teeth

The teeth are usually made from or coated with tungsten carbide, which is a metal twice as hard as steel and more resistant to heat damage. Tungsten carbide is used on other cutting tools designed for use in masonry, such as drill bits.

 
         
 
Masonry saw blades have rounded teeth
 

Rounded teeth

Unlike most other saws which have pointed teeth designed to slice through the fibres of material, some masonry saw blades  have teeth with rounded tips.

 

This is for two reasons:

 
         
 
Rounded teeth of masonry saw
 

1. Pointed teeth would become rounded in masonry very quickly.

 

2. When cutting, the round teeth chip away at the material rather than slicing through it.

 
         
  Masonry saws have what’s known as a closed pistol grip handle.  

Handle

Masonry saws have what’s known as a closed pistol grip handle. This type of handle isusually found on saws with larger or longer blades. 

The handle supports the blade and makes it easier for the user to apply force to the saw when cutting through tough materials.