what-is-a-fret-saw

     
 

What is a fret saw?

 

         
         
  Shop for Fret Saws   
         
         
  Fret saw  

A fret saw is very similar to a coping saw except that it has a longer frame which extends further away from the blade.

 

A fret saw is sometimes referred to as a scroll saw, as it is ideal for very precise scrollwork, which is the cutting of complex shapes in the interior of a wooden surface.  

 
         
     

Application

 
  Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw is used for even more precise cutting, involving tighter curves and more delicate shapes.  

Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw is used for even more precise cutting, involving tighter curves and more delicate shapes.

 

Because of its longer frame, a fret saw is able to cut further from the edge of material.

 
         
     

Material

 
  A fret saw is primarily used in wood and plastic, however there are special blades available which can cut through metals.  

Like a coping saw, a fret saw is primarily used on wood and plastic, however there are special blades available which can cut through metals.

 
         
     

Why is it called a fret saw?

 
  Designs cut by a Fret saw  

A fret saw gets its name from the French word freter, which means ‘lattice’, a structure made from overlapping pieces of material that form intricate patterns.

 

This is a reference to the complex designs that can be cut with the saw. 

 
         
     

Characteristics

 
  Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw has an even thinner, shorter blade which can cut even tighter curves.  

Blade

Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw has an even thinner, shorter blade which can cut even tighter curves.

 

Fret saw blades are usually 130mm (5.11″ approx.) in length. 

 
         
  A fret saw blade is very fragile and would not be suitable for heavy duty applications  

You should bear in mind that, like a coping saw blade, a fret saw blade is very fragile and would not be suitable for heavy duty applications such as cutting very thick pieces of material, or fast, rough cutting.

 
         
  Fret saws cut on the pull stroke  

Cutting stroke

Fret saws cut on the pull stroke, so the teeth should be placed in the frame with the points facing back towards the handle.

 

For more information, see our section: Push stroke saws vs. pull stroke saws

 
         
  A fret saw blade usually has between 14 and 48 teeth per inch.  

Teeth Per Inch (TPI)

A fret saw blade usually has between 14 and 48 teeth per inch.

 

Like a coping saw, the teeth on a fret saw are relatively small in size and have shallow gullets, so they cut and remove less material with each stroke. This means that the cutting process takes longer but you can create more intricate shapes.

 
         
  A fret saw has a straight handle  

Handle

A fret saw has a straight handle. This type of handle is usually found on saws used for delicate or precise work. The cylindrical handle can be turned freely in your hand, meaning you have greater control over the cuts you make.

 

Saws of this kind will not generally be used for fast aggressive cutting, as it is harder to apply force to the saw with this type of handle.

 
         

what-is-a-fret-saw

     
 

What is a fret saw?

 

         
         
  Shop for Fret Saws   
         
         
  Fret saw  

A fret saw is very similar to a coping saw except that it has a longer frame which extends further away from the blade.

 

A fret saw is sometimes referred to as a scroll saw, as it is ideal for very precise scrollwork, which is the cutting of complex shapes in the interior of a wooden surface.  

 
         
     

Application

 
  Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw is used for even more precise cutting, involving tighter curves and more delicate shapes.  

Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw is used for even more precise cutting, involving tighter curves and more delicate shapes.

 

Because of its longer frame, a fret saw is able to cut further from the edge of material.

 
         
     

Material

 
  A fret saw is primarily used in wood and plastic, however there are special blades available which can cut through metals.  

Like a coping saw, a fret saw is primarily used on wood and plastic, however there are special blades available which can cut through metals.

 
         
     

Why is it called a fret saw?

 
  Designs cut by a Fret saw  

A fret saw gets its name from the French word freter, which means ‘lattice’, a structure made from overlapping pieces of material that form intricate patterns.

 

This is a reference to the complex designs that can be cut with the saw. 

 
         
     

Characteristics

 
  Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw has an even thinner, shorter blade which can cut even tighter curves.  

Blade

Compared to a coping saw, a fret saw has an even thinner, shorter blade which can cut even tighter curves.

 

Fret saw blades are usually 130mm (5.11″ approx.) in length. 

 
         
  A fret saw blade is very fragile and would not be suitable for heavy duty applications  

You should bear in mind that, like a coping saw blade, a fret saw blade is very fragile and would not be suitable for heavy duty applications such as cutting very thick pieces of material, or fast, rough cutting.

 
         
  Fret saws cut on the pull stroke  

Cutting stroke

Fret saws cut on the pull stroke, so the teeth should be placed in the frame with the points facing back towards the handle.

 

For more information, see our section: Push stroke saws vs. pull stroke saws

 
         
  A fret saw blade usually has between 14 and 48 teeth per inch.  

Teeth Per Inch (TPI)

A fret saw blade usually has between 14 and 48 teeth per inch.

 

Like a coping saw, the teeth on a fret saw are relatively small in size and have shallow gullets, so they cut and remove less material with each stroke. This means that the cutting process takes longer but you can create more intricate shapes.

 
         
  A fret saw has a straight handle  

Handle

A fret saw has a straight handle. This type of handle is usually found on saws used for delicate or precise work. The cylindrical handle can be turned freely in your hand, meaning you have greater control over the cuts you make.

 

Saws of this kind will not generally be used for fast aggressive cutting, as it is harder to apply force to the saw with this type of handle.