how-to-use-a-drywall-saw

     
 

How to use a drywall saw

 

         
         
  Shop for Drywall Saws  
         
         
     

Before you begin

 
  Most drywall saws cut on both the push and the pull stroke.  

Do you push or pull?

Most drywall saws cut on both the push and the pull stroke. This means that you can apply pressure on either stroke or both for faster more aggressive cutting.

 
         
     

Starting your cut

 
  starting your cut with a Drywall saw  

If you do not have an edge at which to start, you can jab the saw into the centre of the material. The knife-like point at the end of the blade can penetrate through the material easily.

 

Once the tip of the saw has pierced the material, you can push the rest of the blade through.

 
         
  Make your first cut by applying a small amount of downward pressure in one long, slow stroke. When sawing, try and use at least three quarters of the blade.  

If you have an edge at which to start, you can simply rest the blade against this edge and begin your cut.

 

Make your first cut by applying a small amount of downward pressure in one long, slow stroke. When sawing, try and use at least three quarters of the blade.

 
         
  test out your sawing technique on scrap material first.  

Test out your sawing technique on some scrap material to get an idea of how much pressure to apply and the speed at which you feel comfortable. If you mess up a cut, don’t throw a tantrum – Try, try and try again!

 
         
  Drywall saws will produce a rough and ready finish, as they are not designed to be neat and fancy.  

Rough and ready not fine and fancy

As drywall is generally used as an underlay, and not likely to be on show, a drywall saw is not designed to produce a neat finish.

 

As a result, you do not need to worry too much about the rough and ready finish produced by the saw.

 
         

how-to-use-a-drywall-saw

     
 

How to use a drywall saw

 

         
         
  Shop for Drywall Saws  
         
         
     

Before you begin

 
  Most drywall saws cut on both the push and the pull stroke.  

Do you push or pull?

Most drywall saws cut on both the push and the pull stroke. This means that you can apply pressure on either stroke or both for faster more aggressive cutting.

 
         
     

Starting your cut

 
  starting your cut with a Drywall saw  

If you do not have an edge at which to start, you can jab the saw into the centre of the material. The knife-like point at the end of the blade can penetrate through the material easily.

 

Once the tip of the saw has pierced the material, you can push the rest of the blade through.

 
         
  Make your first cut by applying a small amount of downward pressure in one long, slow stroke. When sawing, try and use at least three quarters of the blade.  

If you have an edge at which to start, you can simply rest the blade against this edge and begin your cut.

 

Make your first cut by applying a small amount of downward pressure in one long, slow stroke. When sawing, try and use at least three quarters of the blade.

 
         
  test out your sawing technique on scrap material first.  

Test out your sawing technique on some scrap material to get an idea of how much pressure to apply and the speed at which you feel comfortable. If you mess up a cut, don’t throw a tantrum – Try, try and try again!

 
         
  Drywall saws will produce a rough and ready finish, as they are not designed to be neat and fancy.  

Rough and ready not fine and fancy

As drywall is generally used as an underlay, and not likely to be on show, a drywall saw is not designed to produce a neat finish.

 

As a result, you do not need to worry too much about the rough and ready finish produced by the saw.