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Choosing a file: sharpening

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A Great American crosscut saw which has been designed to effectively saw wood across the grain You will quite often find that the file you need to sharpen a tool is named after the tool itself. For example, a crosscut saw should be sharpened with a crosscut file.
A single cut file with teeth cut in just one direction on the file's face Sharpening files tend to be single cut, as double cut files can sometimes ruin a blade edge by cutting it too aggressively.
Image of Wonkee Donkee reading the guide on choosing files based on shaping tasks Suggestions are provided below for which files to use for specific sharpening tasks.

Auger bit

An auger bit which is used for drilling wood Auger bit files

Chainsaw

Image of a chainsaw, which should be sharpened with a chainsaw file Chainsaw and diamond chainsaw files

Crosscut saw

A Great American crosscut saw which has been designed to effectively saw wood across the grain Crosscut saw, double ended saw, mill and taper saw files

Knife or single bladed tool

A kitchen knife which lends its name to knife files Single cut flat, hand and mill files

Rip saw

Image of a saw with rip cut teeth Double ended saw, mill and taper saw files

Saw (other than crosscut saw, rip saw and web saw)

Image showing a saw with M shaped teeth that can be sharpened with a cant saw file Cant saw and mill files

Veneer knife

A selection of veneer knives, which can be sharpened with a veneer knife file Veneer knife files

Web saw

Circular saw blade with wide angled teeth. This can be sharpened with a web saw file. Web saw files

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