how-to-repair-a-damaged-crowbar

How to repair a damaged crowbar

Shop for Crowbars

A Bent Digging Bar No well-made bar should ever break or snap, but the metal bars are constructed from can bend or twist with prolonged use.
Spring Steel If you are particularly concerned with the lifespan of your bar, it may be worth investing in one constructed from spring steel, which can be reformed more easily than other metals.

For more information, see: What are bars made of?

What can you do if your bar becomes bent or twisted?

A Qualified Steelworker at Work Straightening a bent bar is not an easy task, and should not be undertaken lightly – this is a job which requires high levels of strength and skill. If you are unsure of your ability, it would be better to take your bar to a qualified, professional steelworker for repair – or simply buy a new one.

If you feel comfortable attempting to reshape your bar yourself, there are a few methods which may work:

Cross Peen & Dead Blow Hammer Lay the bent portion of the bar across a sturdy, flat surface (e.g. a tree stump, anvil, etc) and beat the bend into line using a heavy duty striking tool, such as a blacksmith’s cross peen hammer (about 2-3lbs).

A dead blow hammer may also be effective in concentrating strike force into one focused point, while minimising damage to the metal.

A Sledgehammer Though a sledgehammer may seem like the first choice, it isn’t ideal for this task, as the head spreads striking force over a wide area. In the long run, this will slow you down, as reshaping a bent digging bar requires a focused impact with each strike.

Vice with Bar Inserted Find the bend using a straight edge, then place the bar in a vice, with the bent portion central, and tighten as far as possible. Remove the bar from the vice and remeasure the bend using the straight edge.

If the bend is still measurable, place the bar back in the vice, and repeat the process. Continue until the bar is straight.

 WONKEE DONKEE says: Put your back into it!
Wooded Area If you need to straighten a bar ‘in the field’, and have a hammer available, you can use a grooved log and one appropriately booted foot to hold your bar steady, and strike the bend repeatedly with your hammer.
Hydraulic Press If you have access to a hydraulic press, you can use this to straighten a bent bar – however, you must be qualified to use it, and WONKEE DONKEE isn’t permitted to instruct you how.
A Wallet None of these options guarantee a fix – on many occasions, a bent bar may require professional help. In this case, the cheaper alternative would be to buy a new one.
Heating a Bar - Don't Do It!

Note:

Do not heat your bar to make it more malleable; this will soften the metal permanently. Alternatively, heating and then quenching the metal (dousing it in cold water) will cause it to harden too quickly, and become brittle.