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What are the types of screw head?

The head of the screw is the top portion and is usually wider than the rest of the screw’s body.

 

Screw heads come in many different shapes.

Countersunk or Flat Screw Heads

A countersunk head has a flat top that tapers towards the shank.

 

A countersunk head sits flush with the surface of the material rather than protruding above it like other types of screw.


As a result, countersunk heads are commonly used in fixtures where the screw must be partially or fully concealed. 

Countersunk heads are often used in soft and hard woodworking applications.

 

When working with countersunk screws, a countersunk hole is required for the screw to sit flush with the surface of the material. 

 

This can be done using a countersink drill bit. However, some types of countersunk screws have a series of ribs underneath the head, that cut a countersunk hole for the screw as it’s inserted. This eliminates the need for a separate drill bit.

A countersunk head has a flat top that tapers towards the shank.

 

A countersunk head sits flush with the surface of the material rather than protruding above it like other types of screw. As a result, countersunk heads are commonly used in fixtures where the screw must be partially or fully concealed. 

 

Countersunk heads are often used in soft and hard woodworking applications.

When working with countersunk screws, a countersunk hole is required for the screw to sit flush with the surface of the material. 

 

This can be done using a countersink drill bit. However, some types of countersunk screws have a series of ribs underneath the head, that cut a countersunk hole for the screw as it’s inserted. This eliminates the need for a separate drill bit.

Raised or Oval Screw Heads

A raised head is a cross between a countersunk and a round head. It has a round top but tapers towards the shank. 

 

Raised heads are commonly used when a more decorative finish is required. An example of this is the use of raised screws in light switch fixtures.

A raised head is a cross between a countersunk and a round head. It has a round top but tapers towards the shank. 

 

Raised heads are commonly used when a more decorative finish is required. An example of this is the use of raised screws in light switch fixtures.

Domed or Round Screw Heads

A domed head has a round top with a flat underside. Unlike a countersunk screw, a domed head screw sits above the work surface and is used when a more decorative finish is required. 

 

A screw with a domed head is typically used for fixtures such as mirrors.

A domed head has a round top with a flat underside. Unlike a countersunk screw, a domed head screw sits above the work surface and is used when a more decorative finish is required. 

 

A screw with a domed head is typically used for fixtures such as mirrors.

Pan Screw Heads

A pan head looks like an upside-down frying pan and has a flat top with short rounded sides.

 

Pan head screws are mainly used for metalwork because when they are inserted correctly, their large diameter head holds the material firmly.

A pan head looks like an upside-down frying pan and has a flat top with short rounded sides.

 

Pan head screws are mainly used for metalwork because when they are inserted correctly, their large diameter head holds the material firmly.

Truss Screw Heads

A truss head has a very wide rounded top. Manufacturers of these types of screws claim that because they have practically no edge on their head, it is relatively hard to tamper with or remove them. 

 

A screw with a truss head is typically used for gutters and metalwork.

A truss head has a very wide rounded top.

 

Manufacturers of these types of screws claim that because they have practically no edge on their head, it is relatively hard to tamper with or remove them. 

 

A screw with a truss head is typically used for gutters and metalwork.

Hexagonal or Socket Screw Heads

A hexagonal or socket head is hexagonally-shaped with a flat underside.

 

This type of head sits above the surface of the material and is usually found on larger screws, as it allows for more torque to be applied when tightening.

If the hexagonal head has a drive, it can be turned using the correct screwdriver bit. 

 

If the hex head doesn’t have a drive, you will need to use a hex driver to turn it.

A hexagonal or socket head is hexagonally-shaped with a flat underside.

 

This type of head sits above the surface of the material and is usually found on larger screws, as it allows for more torque to be applied when tightening.

 

If the hexagonal head has a drive, it can be turned using the correct screwdriver bit. 

 

If the hex head doesn’t have a drive, you will need to use a hex driver to turn it.

Bugle Screw Heads

A bugle-shaped head looks very similar to a countersunk one except that the sides are rounded.

 

Like a countersunk head, a bugle head sits flush with the surface of the material rather than protruding above it like other types of screw. 

Bugle heads are most commonly found on drywall screws, as the curved sides are less likely to damage the surface of the drywall when the screw is inserted.

A bugle-shaped head looks very similar to a countersunk one except that the sides are rounded.

 

Like a countersunk head, a bugle head sits flush with the surface of the material rather than protruding above it like other types of screw. 

 

Bugle heads are most commonly found on drywall screws, as the curved sides are less likely to damage the surface of the drywall when the screw is inserted.