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 What are the parts of
aviation snips?

Shop for Tinsnips and Aviation Snips

Aviation snips consist of a blade, pivot bolt, linkage screws and handles with grips

Aviation snip blades

Aviation shears have different blades for different uses The blades should be sharp and strong, so they can cut metal and other tough materials. The blades can come in different lengths and designs, depending on their intended use, including long cut, offset and bulldog blades.
Serrated edges on aviation tin snips grip the material to help prevent slipping Usually one or both of the blades will have a serrated edge, which helps to grip the material as they cut. These serrations will usually leave a slightly perforated edge.

Aviation snip pivot bolt

The pivot bolt on aviation snips holds the blades in place This bolt keeps the blades in the correct alignment, ensuring they are able to cut effectively. This bolt can be adjusted to ensure the blades pivot past each other correctly. The blades may need adjusting if the tool is not cutting correctly.

Aviation snip inkage screws

The double pivot on aviation snips gives them more leverage for cutting tougher materials These screws connect the two levers together. This double pivoting system and the extra linkage points are what give aviation snips their compound action. This increases the leverage of the tool, so it can cut through tougher materials with less force on the handles.

For more information see: How do aviation snips work?

Aviation snip handles

Aviation snips often have colour coded handles so you can easily recognise which cuts in which direction The handles are used in the same way as scissors. They operate the pivots which, in turn, moves the blades. These are often colour coded to indicate the direction they are designed to cut in, with yellow being straight, red – left and green – right.

Aviation snip grips

The grips on the handle of aviation snips stop the users hand from slipping towards the blade The grips are an additional feature, which should stop the user’s hand slipping towards the blades. These should also make the tool more comfortable to hold.

Aviation snip locking latch

Aviation snips have a locking latch for safety Another additional feature is the latch, which can simply be clicked on when the tool is not in use to keep the blades locked shut.

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