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How to replace a wooden maul handle

Shop for Fencing Mauls and Post Rammers

all tools with eventually require some repair With prolonged use, many tools will eventually require some repair.
Tools required for step by step guide to repairing a fencing maul. If your fencing maul handle requires replacing,  use our simple step by step guide…

Things you will need:

A handsaw, preferably coarse toothed, is required to replace a timber or wooden maul handle Hand saw – preferably coarse toothed
A vice will be required to support the maul head Vice
you will require a drill to drill out the old maul handle Drill
7mm or 1/2" drill bit to remove wooden maul handle from maul head 7mm or ½” drill bit for wood
You will need a hammer to help you remove the wooden maul handle Hammer
A chisel will be needed to help you remove the old wooden maul handle Chisel
Course grain sandpaper may come in handy when cleaning out the maul head eye Sandpaper – Coarse grain
Use a wooden handle replacement kit when replacing the fencing maul handle.
Wooden maul handle replacement kit – consisting of a handle, wedges and pins.
use the coarse toothed handsaw to cut away any remaining broken handle
Step 1 – Remove remaining maul handle

Use the coarse toothed handsaw to cut away any remaining broken handle on the underside of the maul head.

Place the maul head securely in to a vice.

Step 2 – Clamp and support maul head

Place the head in a vice if you have access to one.

if no vice is available place the maul head onto two solid surfaces. If you do not have a vice, put the maul head on two solid surfaces with a gap in the middle and from the top down, using the hammer and the old maul handle as a punch, knock out the remaining handle through the gap.

This should be done in the same direction as the old handle would have been inserted.

using a drill with a drill bit, drill holes in the maul handle wood to help release the handle from the maul head

Step 3 – Drill out remains of handle

This may well go to plan, but if the remaining handle is in too tight then it may require some assistance.

Using a drill with a drill bit, drill holes in the wood, either through the top or the underside as this should help release the pressure holding the wood in place.

For a secure attachment, adjust the maul handle so that it is a tight fit in the maul head

Step 4 – Re-size handle

If the new handle, when held to the eye on the maul head, is more than 2mm too big for the eye, it will need sanding down to size.

However, bear in mind that the maul handle needs to be slightly too big to ensure it fits securely in the maul head.

A slide fit or loose handle should never be fitted as there is no way of making a secure fit and this makes the tool unsafe for use.
put the head of the maul onto bench with the underside facing, insert the handle into the head, using a hammer to gently tap into place

Step 5 – Insert maul handle

Put the head of the maul onto the bench with the underside facing up.

Insert the handle into the head (the end that has just been made to size) and use a hammer to gently tap the opposite end of the handle to fit into the head.

 Use the vice to hold the head securely whilst fitting the new maul handle to the maul head If needed, use the vice to hold the head still, whilst fitting the new maul handle.
Hold the maul head with the handle pointing down. Tap the handle firmly on the ground to force the maul handle into the eye of the maul head.

Step 6 – Use firm taps as neccessary

If a more forceful approach is needed, take hold of the maul head with the new handle inserted, and place the end of the handle on the ground.

Keeping a tight grip on the head, firmly tap the handle on the ground to push it into place.

when the handle is fitted to the maul head, there should be at least 20mm of handle protuding from the maul head.

Step 7 – Check handle for size

When fitted, there should be at least 20mm (3/4″) of handle showing through the top.

Wooden wedges and metal pins will have been supplied with the new maul handle.

Step 8 – Locate wedges

Two small wooden wedges and two metal pins will have been supplied with the new maul handle. These are for securing the handle in place and to stop the maul head from coming loose.

Maul head with wooden securing wedge and metal pin securing wooden maul handle to maul head
place the maul on a bench and try each wooden edge into the slots.

Step 9 – Try wedges for size

Put the maul on a bench, and try each wooden wedge into the slots, to ensure that, when fitted, they are large enough to expand the handle sufficiently to clamp the head.

open the wedge slots using a chisel then insert the two wooden wedges as far as possible, tapping into place with a hammer if required

Step 10 – Insert wedges

Open up the wedge slots using a chisel, then insert the two wooden wedges as far in as possible, tapping into place with a hammer if required.

Trim off excess maul handle with a handsaw to give a flush surface

Step 11 – Trim excess maul handle

Trim off any excess handle with a handsaw to give a flush surface, then sand down until all splinters and edges are removed.

Drive the metal securing pins into the maul handle
Step 12 – Secure with pin

Drive in the metal securing pin perpendicular to the wooden wedges (as shown in the diagram) and the handle should now be tightly fitted into the head.

And Breathe
Apply boiled linseed oil to the new maul handle To improve longevity of the handle, take some fine grain sand paper and lightly sand the wood, then apply boiled linseed oil.

Linseed oil will keep the handle in prime condition as well as making it water-resistant.

                                 

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