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How to extract a screw or bolt using
spiral fluted extractors?

Shop for Bolt Extractors

Equipment you will need:

First you need to gather the required tools that are necessary for removing a damaged or broken screw. You will need: Drill, drill bit, centre drill bit, screw extractors, T handle or bar type tap wrench, sharp centre punch, ball-pein hammer and vice grip locking pliers. First you need to gather the required tools that are necessary for removing a damaged or broken screw. You will need:

  • Drill
  • Drill bit and centre drill bit
  • Screw extractors
  • T handle or bar type tap wrench
  • Sharp centre punch
  • Ball-pein hammer
  • Vice grip locking pliers
Place the centre punch tip as near to the centre of the screw as you possibly can. Once you are happy it is placed in the the centre, tap the end of the centre punch with the hammer. This will create an indent ready for a pilot hole. This will prevent the drill bit from wandering when drilling.

Step 1 – Create pilot hole

Place the centre punch tip as near to the centre of the screw as you possibly can.

Once you are happy it is placed in the centre, tap the end of the centre punch with the hammer. This will create an indent ready for a pilot hole and will help to prevent the drill bit from wandering when drilling.

You can now attach the centre drill bit to your power drill and set to clockwise rotation.

Step 2 – Attach centre drill bit

You can now attach the centre drill bit to your power drill.

Place the tip of the centre drill bit into the indent made by the centre punch, pull the trigger of the drill and place the bit against the screw's indent to create a guide for the larger drill bit.

Step 3 – Place centre drill bit

Place the tip of the centre drill bit in the indent made by the centre punch and squeeze the trigger of the drill. This will create a large indent for the next stage of drilling

You now need to drill into the head of the screw to create a pilot hole to accommodate the screw extractor. The depth of the pilot hole will vary according to the extractor size you will be using. You will need to drill carefully and deep enough to fit the end of the extractor, so it has enough room to turn and grab the screw or bolt.

Step 4 – Select drill bit

You now need to drill into the head of the screw to create a pilot hole to accommodate the screw extractor. The diameter and depth of the pilot hole will vary according to the extractor size you will be using.

The size of the drill bit used to reach the recommended depth can be found on a drill size guide if available on the product's case. If not available, use a drill bit 2/3 of the diameter of the damaged or broken screw.

What size drill bit?

Some drill bit sets come with a size guide that will include a recommendation on the correct drill bit diameter for different applications.

If a size guide is not available, a handy rule of thumb is to use a drill bit two thirds of the diameter of the damaged or broken screw.

Drill to the depth recommended in the screw extractor's instructions, typically about three times the diameter of the largest bit used to make this hole. Make sure you keep the drill bit at the centre to avoid damaging or breaking the screw even more.

Step 5 – Drill pilot hole

Drill to the depth recommended in the screw extractor’s instructions. This is typically about three times the diameter of the largest bit used to make this hole.

Make sure you keep the drill bit at the centre to avoid damaging or breaking the screw even more. You will need to drill carefully and deep enough to fit the end of the extractor, so it has enough room to turn and grab the screw or bolt.

Next, use one of the tap wrenches, either the 't-handle' or 'bar type' depending on the area you are working. If you are working in a confined space, the 't-handle' will give you extra reach. Connect your chosen tap wrench to the head of the extractor.

Step 6 – Select tap wrench

Next, use one of the tap wrenches, either the ‘t-handle’ or ‘bar type’ depending on the area you are working.

If you are working in a confined space, the ‘t-handle’ will give you extra reach.

Connect your chosen tap wrench to the head of the extractor.

Turn the tap wrench anti-clockwise so the extractor tightens into the screw. Keep turning the extractor anti-clockwise whilst applying even pressure.

Step 7 – Use tap wrench

Push down and turn the tap wrench anti-clockwise so the extractor tightens into the screw.

Keep turning the extractor anti-clockwise whilst applying even pressure.

When the screw is protruding you can continue extracting the screw with a pair of vice grip pliers or an adjustable spanner. This will provide more leverage.

Step 8 – Extract screw

When the screw is protruding, you can continue extracting the screw with a pair of vice grip pliers or an adjustable spanner. This will provide more leverage.