Our other sites:

What types of sprue cutter bevel are available?

Shop for Sprue Cutters

Three possible bevels found on the cutting edges of sprue cutters are; micro bevel, flush bevel and ultra flush bevel The cutting edges of sprue cutters have one of three types of bevel: micro, flush or ultra flush.

Micro bevel

Micro bevel cutting edges have the largest bevel and leave the largest nub on the part removed from the sprue. Sprue cutters with a micro bevel have a bevel placed on the back (flat side) of the jaw’s cutting edge. Micro bevels are usually found on thicker jaws that are designed for cutting thicker or harder materials, where this relatively large bevel is needed to provide the sharp point for the cutting edge of the thicker jaws.
Sprue cutters with micro bevel jaws leave the largest nub after cutting a part from the sprue Due to the thickness of the jaws and the angle of the bevel, micro bevel cutting edges leave the largest nub on the part after cutting it from the sprue, so the nub will require the most filing and finishing to achieve a smooth, flush finish on the part.
Advantages and disadvantages of micro bevels ADVANTAGES   DISADVANTAGES
  • Micro bevels maintain their cutting ability for longer than other bevels
  • Best cutting edge for thicker or very hard material
  • Leaves the largest nub on the part removed from the sprue
  • As found on thicker jaws, cannot be used to remove small intricate parts from sprues
  • More force is required to make a cut with jaws that have a micro bevel

Flush bevel

Flush bevel cutting edges have a smaller bevel than micro bevels and leave a smaller nub on the part removed from a sprue. Sprue cutters with a flush bevel have a smaller bevel on the back of the jaws than those with a micro bevel. Jaws with a flush bevel are thinner than those with micro bevels so require a smaller bevel to give a sharp cutting edge. This does mean they are not as strong and so less suited to cutting hard or thick materials when compared to micro bevels.
Sprue cutters with flush bevel jaws leave a smaller nub on the part removed from the sprue than a micro bevel would Flush bevel jaws make cuts that leave smaller nubs than those left by micro bevel jaws. This means less filing of the finished part is require to remove the remains of the nub, saving time. However, the cutting edge does not last as long as a micro bevel cutting edge.
Advantages and disadvantages of a sprue cutter with a flush bevel ADVANTAGES   DISADVANTAGES
  • Leaves a smaller nub than a micro bevel
  • Less force is required to make the cut than with a micro bevel
  • Most versatile bevel as can be used to cut the greatest range of materials and thicknesses
  • Cutting edge does not last as long as on a micro bevel
  • Not as well suited to cutting thick or hard materials as a micro bevel

Ultra flush bevel

Ultra flush bevel cutting edges have virtually no bevel on the back of the jaws and so leave no nub on the part removed from the sprue. A sprue cutter with an ultra flush bevel has a minimal angle, or no angle at all, placed on the back of the jaw’s cutting edge. However, ultra flush bevels can only be placed on jaws that are very thin, so they will not be suitable for cutting thick or hard material as they do not have the required strength.
Sprue cutters with an ultra flush bevel on their jaws leave the smallest nub on the part removed from the sprue Ultra flush bevels give the best finish to the part removed from the sprue, leaving little or no nub to be filed away. This type of bevel is most commonly seen on sprue cutters designed for cutting soft materials such as plastic.
Advantages and disadvantages of ADVANTAGES   DISADVANTAGES
  • Leaves the smallest nub and so requires least amount of filing
  • Requires the least amount of force to make the cut so reduces user fatigue
  • As found on thinner jaws can cut small delicate parts from sprues
  • Cutting edge does not last as long as other bevels, so will require more frequent sharpening
  • Cannot cut thick or hard material as only available on thin jaws

Which type of bevel should you choose?

An ultra flush bevel is the best cutting edge to have on a sprue cutter jaw if it is being used to cut thin soft materials The best type of bevel to have on the jaws of a sprue cutter depends on what you plan to use it for. If you intend to use it for model making and it will only be used on soft, thin material, such as photo etched parts, then an ultra flush bevel is best as it will minimise, or even eliminate, any additional filing of the part once it is removed from the sprue.
Micro bevels are the best cutting edge to have on a sprue cutters jaws for when cutting thick hard materials. If you are going to be using a sprue cutter to cut thick, hard material then you will want one with micro bevel cutting edges on its jaws. This will give the jaws the strength required for this task, although it will mean you have more filing of the part to do, to remove the remaining nub.
Flush bevels are the best type of cutting edge for sprue cutters that will be used to cut a variety of different materials. If you will be using your sprue cutter on a variety of materials of different thicknesses then you should choose a flush bevel as it will give you the best compromise between strength and cutting finish.