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What are the different types of
manual mixing paddle?

Shop for Mixing Paddles

Mud mashers

The first type of manual mixing paddle is a semi-round head mud masher. Most common mud mashers found will have a hardwood handle. This type of paddle is suitable for mixing joint compound and plaster by hand. The first type of manual mixing paddle is a semi-round head mud masher, so called because in drywall terms ready mixed compound is called mud.

Most common mud mashers found will have a hardwood handle.

This type of paddle is suitable for mixing joint compound and plaster by hand. 

This manual mixing paddle has the name "Mud masher" because it is commonly known for mixing joint compound. Joint compound is also known as 'Mud'. This manual mixing paddle has the name “mud masher” because it is commonly known for mixing joint compound. Joint compound is also known as ‘mud’.
This image shows the mud masher in action. It demonstrates how to move the masher from top to bottom, and how the mix escapes through the grid face. This image shows the mud masher in action. It demonstrates how to move the masher from top to bottom, and how the mix escapes through the grid face. 

Plasterer’s mixing wheels

The second type of manual paddle is the plasterer's mixing wheel, which can be used for plaster or any similar materials. Built with a wheel and a tubular steel shaft, this mixing paddle is best suited for more heavy duty work. This means it can withstand wear, while mixing large volumes of plaster or similar materials. The second type of manual paddle is the plasterer’s mixing wheel, which can be used for plaster or any similar materials.

Built with a wheel and a tubular steel shaft, this mixing paddle is best suited for more heavy duty work. This means it can withstand wear, while mixing large volumes of plaster or similar materials.

The plasterer's mixing wheel is placed in the mix using a 'T' shaped handle to help push the wheel from the top of the mix to the bottom. The wheel allows the mix to escape through the gaps while it mixes. The plasterer’s mixing wheel is placed in the mix using a ‘T’ shaped handle to help push the wheel from the top of the mix to the bottom. The wheel allows the mix to escape through the gaps while it mixes.

Mud masher or plasterer’s mixing wheel?

The plasterer's mixing wheel would be the best choice if you were going to purchase out of these two. The mixing wheel gives you the option to mix small or large volumes of plaster, and even similar materials such as cement, mortar, sealants, adhesives and fillers. As well as this, the heavy duty construction of the mixing wheel means it can withstand wear and tear. The plasterer’s mixing wheel would be the best choice if you were going to purchase out of these two.

The mixing wheel gives you the option to mix small or large volumes of plaster, and even similar materials such as cement, mortar, sealants, adhesives and fillers.

As well as this, the heavy duty construction of the mixing wheel means it can withstand wear and tear.

The mud masher head is made from heavy gauge steel, meaning it has a strong design which can handle viscous materials. Even though it has a strong design, it's likely to bend and lose its shape if it's constantly used with viscous materials. It is down to you what you use the mud masher to mix, however, we recommend that you stick to mixing plaster. The mud masher head is made from heavy gauge steel, meaning it has a strong design which can handle viscous materials.

Even though it has a strong design, it’s likely to bend and lose its shape if it’s constantly used with viscous materials. It is down to you what you use the mud masher to mix, however, we recommend that you stick to mixing plaster.

What’s heavy gauge steel?

Heavy gauge steel is a steel that is measured in gauge. The larger the gauge number, the thinner the steel. Gauge is defined differently for ferrous (iron-based) and non-ferrous metals (e.g. aluminium and brass). Heavy gauge steel is a steel that is measured in gauge.

The larger the gauge number, the thinner the steel. Gauge is defined differently for ferrous (iron-based) and non-ferrous metals (e.g. aluminium and brass).